All About Cockers

All About The Cocker Breed


Cocker Spaniel Dogs

Picture of a Cocker Spaniel dog

Cocker Spaniel Dynamics
Based on 6,188 Dogster profiles
  Energy  
sleepy energetic
 
  Intelligence  
silly genius
 
  Friendliness  
aggressive affectionate
 
  Playfulness  
not playful very playful
 
  Disposition  
anxious calm
 


 Possible Health Concerns:   Less Common Health Concerns:

Weight:

20 - 35 pounds (9.07 - 15.88 kg)

Height:

12 - 16 inches (30.48 - 40.64 cm)

Trademark Traits

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Some Ideal Human Companions

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What They’re Like to Live With

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Though largely bred to be a live-in companion, Cocker Spaniels still retain the genes of their hunting ancestors, making them equally sporty and cuddly. With a Cocker Spaniel in the house, you have a dog that’s got the toughness and ingenuity of a hunting dog and the sensitivity and kindness of a household pet.

An active dog, they will keep busy in the house, playing with toys and objects and family members. They love being around people, crave attention, but also have a working dog’s self-sufficiency. Cocker Spaniels are quick-to-learn, obey easily and have a sweet and trusting nature. They are generally good with strangers, but make an excellent watchdog when they feel that the home is threatened.

Cocker Spaniels are amazingly adaptable. If you’re an active hiker, these dogs will keep pace with you all the livelong day. If you also just like to enjoy your time in sun, grab your umbrella and your cocker spaniel will be just as happy as you are enjoying the sun or shade. If you’re a couch potato, your Cocker Spaniel will gladly join you on the sofa. They’ll be perfectly happy in an apartment or house, as long as they get a decent amount of exercise and attention.


Things You Should Know

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Being a popular pet for several decades, Cocker Spaniels have suffered from over-breeding, which has caused a number of health and personality issues—e.g. aggressiveness, shyness and roaming—that are not typical of the breed. Take care to socialize and train your Cocker Spaniel puppy to make them comfortable with children and other animals.

Cocker Spaniels need daily grooming—washing and brushing—to keep their lovely coats in shape. Also, clean their ears regularly to prevent infection.

A healthy Cocker Spaniel can live as long as 15 years. Common health problems include eye issues (glaucoma, cataracts), spinal problems and skin problems.



Cocker Spaniel History

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The smallest of the “sporting group” of Spaniels, Cocker Spaniels were originally bred to hunt in the English countryside. They were especially good at hunting woodcocks, hence the name “cocker.” During the mid-19th century, American breeders developed a smaller Cocker Spaniel that became a popular pet across the country. American Cocker Spaniels differ so much from the English variety that they are now considered a separate breed.




The Look of the Cocker Spaniel

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Noted for their silky coats and long ears, Cocker Spaniels have small, sturdy, well-balanced frames. Their clean-cut heads have wide muzzles, square jaws and upper lips that hang over their lower jaws. Their ears are long and feathered, their eyes are dark and almond-shaped and their noses are either black or brown depending on the coat. They have long necks, deep chests, short backs and (usually) docked tails that are carried in line with the back. Their coats are silky, wavy and easy to comb. They come in black, black with tan spots, light cream, dark red and other combinations. Overall, Cocker Spaniels have a balanced, alert stance


Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Dogs

Picture of a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel dog

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Dynamics
Based on 2,417 Dogster profiles
  Energy  
sleepy energetic
 
  Intelligence  
silly genius
 
  Friendliness  
aggressive affectionate
 
  Playfulness  
not playful very playful
 
  Disposition  
anxious calm
 

Weight:

10 - 18 pounds (4.54 - 8.16 kg)

Height:

12 - 13 inches (30.48 - 33.02 cm)

Trademark Traits


Some Ideal Human Companions


What They’re Like to Live With


Cavalier King Charles Spaniels are endearing, lovable companions. Affectionate without being jealous, energetic without being frenzied, they are superb pals for playing around the house, cuddling on the sofa and tossing a ball in the yard.

These dogs get along with everybody—cats and other pets included. They are very good playmates for children, being patient and playful, and make a good first impression with strangers. Some can be a little reserved with new people, but they quickly warm up. For this reason, the King Charles is probably not the best choice for a watchdog.



Things You Should Know


Cavalier King Charles Spaniels may look like adorable lapdogs that want nothing more than a comfy couch, but they descend from a long line of hunters. Therefore, they might not be the best choice for apartment living. Give them room to run—preferably in a fenced back yard—and take them for a jaunt in the woods now and then. However, don’t forget the leash: They love to chase cars and small critters.

Being people-oriented dogs, King Charles Spaniels crave companionship and attention, rewarding their owners with equal amounts of affection. Don’t ignore them or leave them alone for too long: They can get depressed, lonely and sometimes batty.

A healthy Cavalier King Charles Spaniel can live as long as 14 years. Common health problems include a heart condition called mitral valve disease, hip dysplasia and ear infections. They need daily brushing, ear cleaning and occasional grooming.



Cavalier King Charles Spaniel History


The original King Charles Spaniels were popular dogs during the reign of Charles II, who adored small dogs. In many17th-century paintings, these elegant canines sit on the laps of princes and princesses. Over the years, the breed evolved, creating a diversity of types that did not resemble the original. An American dog breeder named Roswell Eldridge went to England in the1920s to find several of the classic King Charles Spaniels. Finding few options, he offered a prize for the best female and male breeds shown at the annual Crufts show. This sparked a new interest in King Charles Spaniels, but they did not receive AKC recognition until 1996.



The Look of the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel


Cavalier King Charles Spaniels have small, well-proportioned frames with silky, wavy coats. Their rounded heads are in proportion to their bodies with conical muzzles and dark, well-developed noses. Their pendant (hanging) ears are set high and slightly feathered. They have long necks, sloping shoulders and straight forelegs. Their wagging tails are covered in fur and are not carried too high. They come in black & tan, tri-color, red, and chestnut on white. Overall, Cavalier King Charles Spaniels have an elegant and noble posture.

 

Information From Dogster.com


Cocker Spaniel Information

Cocker Spaniel  dog

Cocker Spaniel Temperament

A charming and gentle mannered creature, the Cocker Spaniel is a dog that enjoys playing but also has a clam and dignified manner about him. This is a dog that gets along well with children, especially when raised with them, and get on well with other animals and with strangers. The Cocker Spaniel is a sociable and amiable dog with a cheerful outlook on life and a responsive attitude. He is highly intelligent making him a stand-out at obedience training. The Cocker Spaniel is a dog that will usually be pretty easy to train, and will be fine for the more inexperienced dog owner as well as more experienced owners.

The Cocker Spaniel is a willing, enthusiastic, and keen dog, and is eager to please, active, and very friendly. Owners may find that these dogs are difficult to housebreak, and often barking can be a problem. These dogs are affectionate, which is great news for those looking for a devoted pet, but the Cocker Spaniel can sometimes get a little over dedicated and clingy, which makes him something of a demanding pet, and certainly not ideal for those that cannot dedicate the time to look after a pet and pay it plenty of attention.

 

Cocker Spaniel Appearance

The Cocker Spaniel is a pretty, dignified, and elegant looking dog, with a silky, medium length coat and a shorter, undercoat. The coloring can be black, buff, or chocolate, and may have tan trims. The ears of the Cocker Spaniel are long, silky, and hang to the side, adding to its sweet and innocent expression. These dogs are about 13-16 inches in height, and the weight of the Cocker Spaniel is around 22-28 pounds. His body is small but sturdy, and he is a medium shedder, which means that he is not ideal for those with allergies.

 

Cocker Spaniel Grooming

The coat of the Cocker Spaniel should be brushed every couple of days in order to keep it in good condition, and every couple of months or so you may need to get the coat clipped. Also, during grooming sessions you should check the ear canals to ensure that they are clean and dry.

 

Cocker Spaniel Health Problems and Life Expectancy

The life expectancy of the Cocker Spaniel is around 10-14 years, and there are a number of health problems that are linked to this breed. This includes PRS. HD, cataracts, autoimmune problems, skin conditions, and epilepsy. You should ensure that the parents of the Cocker Spaniel have OFA and CERF certificates.

 

Cocker Spaniel History

The Cocker Spaniel was recognized in England in the late 1880s, and in the same period was also introduced in America. The Cocker Spaniel is though to originate from Spanish blood, and this breed was registered with the AKC in 1878.

 Information from JustDogBreeds.com




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